Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Using AAC with Birth-Three

This document describes different communicative functions, when to begin AAC, and how to introduce it. Source: Heather Atkins, MS, CCC-SLP 2004

Read more

Introduction to Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC)

This video developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) will help caregivers to understand a variety of communication strategies, as well as how and why people communicate.

Read more

Getting Started with AAC

This document describes how you can get started with AAC (e.g. offering choices, taking turns, using objects, modelling how to use the AAC system).

Read more

Augmentative Communication Services Resource List

This list of AAC-related resources was developed by KidsAbility in order to support children with complex communication needs and their families.

Read more

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) Partner Strategies

This video was developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) in order provide an overview of strategies used to enhance communication.

Read more

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) in Everyday Routines

This video was developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) in order to help caregivers learn why daily routines are important in AAC, and to learn how daily routines can create opportunities for communication.

Read more

101+ Ideas for Using Early Communication Devices

This document provides 100+ ideas of how a single message communication device could be used. Source: www.spectronicsinoz.com This list was compiled by Barbara Solomonson SLP, MS CCC-SLP with help from others at different message boards and listserves.

Read more

Itsy Bitsy Spider (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Itsy Bitsy Spider). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time… Read more »

Read more

Old MacDonald (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Old MacDonald). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time the… Read more »

Read more

Begin AAC Now: 10 Things To Do

When should you start AAC, and what can you do to get started? This website includes many useful links and resources.

Read more

AAC: I Have an AAC System Now What?

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Read Together

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Watching TV

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: On A Walk

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Building Toys

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Bathtime

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Mealtime

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Morning Routine

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

AAC Modeling: Getting Dressed

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Read more

Places Page

This is a sample “places” page (with 18 places) from an expressive language tool. Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “go + restaurant”, or “I + want + home”. This would help… Read more »

Read more