Resources / Augmentative and Alternative Communication

What is AAC?

YRPSLP Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

This video explains what AAC is and when YRPSLP may introduce AAC. Watch video examples demonstrating the strategy Aided Language Stimulation using the AAC tools we use in YRPSLP intervention.

AAC: An Introduction

This document provides answers to questions such as:
What is AAC? Will AAC prevent a student from using or developing natural speech? Why might AAC Intervention improve speech? Are there any Prerequisites for using AAC? What is multimodal communication?
Source: BVSD Assistive Technology Team

AAC Etiquette

Tips for speaking to a person using Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Source: www.waisman.wisc.edu/aac Podcast #12

AAC Myth Busters

Dispelling myths/common misconceptions regarding use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Source: www.prAACticalAAC.org

AAC Myths Dispelled

Here are some common myths that people have about AAC, and a brief description of what is currently known about AAC.
Source: Special Education Technology (SET)- British Columbia; AAC: A Way of Thinking

Using AAC with Young Children

Using AAC with Birth-Three

This document describes different communicative functions, when to begin AAC, and how to introduce it.
Source: Heather Atkins, MS, CCC-SLP 2004

Introduction to Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC)

This video developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) will help caregivers to understand a variety of communication strategies, as well as how and why people communicate.

Getting Started with AAC

This document describes how you can get started with AAC (e.g. offering choices, taking turns, using objects, modelling how to use the AAC system).

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) Partner Strategies

This video was developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) in order provide an overview of strategies used to enhance communication.

Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) in Everyday Routines

This video was developed by The Children’s Treatment Network (CTN) in order to help caregivers learn why daily routines are important in AAC, and to learn how daily routines can create opportunities for communication.

101+ Ideas for Using Early Communication Devices

This document provides 100+ ideas of how a single message communication device could be used.
Source: www.spectronicsinoz.com

This list was compiled by Barbara Solomonson SLP, MS CCC-SLP with help from others at different message boards and listserves.

Itsy Bitsy Spider (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Itsy Bitsy Spider). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time the singing stops. Remember to have fun!

Old MacDonald (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Old MacDonald). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time the singing stops. Remember to have fun!

Twinkle Twinkle (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Twinkle Twinkle). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time the singing stops. Remember to have fun!

Wheels on the Bus (YPRLSP PowerPoint book)

Your child may enjoy watching and listening to this fun and simple Powerpoint song/book (Wheels on the Bus). You might use this to develop your child’s attention span or to help him/her to indicate “more”. For example, your child could look at you, use a gesture, point to a picture, or tap a switch each time the singing stops. Remember to have fun!

Sample Theme Displays

AAC: I Have an AAC System Now What?

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Read Together

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Watching TV

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: On A Walk

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Building Toys

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Bathtime

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Mealtime

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Morning Routine

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

AAC Modeling: Getting Dressed

This practical AAC handout was created by Kate McLaughlin, M.S., CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist: @the.aac.coach

Places Page

This is a sample “places” page (with 18 places) from an expressive language tool.
Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “go + restaurant”, or “I + want + home”. This would help your child learn how the tool is used.

Art Page

This is a sample “art” page (with 14 art-related items) from an expressive language tool.
Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “like + blue”, or “I + see + purple”. This would help your child learn how the tool is used.

Food Page (Simplified)

This is a sample “food” page (with 18 food choices) from an expressive language tool.
Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “more + pizza”, or “help + open”. This would help your child learn how the tool is used.

Food Page (Expanded)

This is a “food” page (with 44 food choices) from a sample expressive language tool.
Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify, or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “want + pizza”, or “I + like + ice cream”. This would help your child learn how the tool is used.

Activities Page

This is an “activities” page (with 44 activity choices) from a sample expressive language tool. Your child could point to pictures to express, clarify, or expand upon his/her thoughts. You could point to pictures as you speak too! For example, you could point to “play + game”, or “I + want + song”. This would help your child learn how the tool is used.

5 Little Ducks

This picture display could be used while you sing the “5 Little Ducks” song with your child. Point to the pictures as you talk or sing. Have fun!

AAC Related Websites

AAC and Early Intervention for Young Children

This website provides early intervention guidelines in order to maximize the language and communication development of young children with complex communication needs, including children with: Autism Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome or Multiple disabilities. The website includes photographs, videos, and success stories!

Augmentative Communication Services Resource List

This list of AAC-related resources was developed by KidsAbility in order to support children with complex communication needs and their families.

Begin AAC Now: 10 Things To Do

When should you start AAC, and what can you do to get started? This website includes many useful links and resources.

International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC)

This website provides a good overview of AAC-related resources and research. ISAAC is a membership organization working to improve the lives of children and adults with complex communication needs.

Potty humour

A young boy uses a high tech communication device to have dinnertime conversation with his sister and potty talk with his brother.

PrAACtical AAC

PrAACtical AAC supports a community of professionals and families who are determined to improve the communication and literacy abilities of people with significant communication difficulties.

Tarheel Reader

This is a collection of free, easy-to-read, and accessible books in many languages. Each book can be speech-enabled and accessed using multiple interfaces (e.g. touchscreens or switches). Users can write their own books using existing pictures/symbols or by uploading their own. In order to create your own books you must create a username then email tarheelreader@cs.unc.edu to request a registration code. This site was created by the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies and the department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

YouTube video by OneKidsPlace

This video by One Kids Place explains and demonstrates Aided Language Stimulation, a partner strategy used to encourage and expand AAC use.

30-day free trial of Boardmaker software

Boardmaker is a software program that allows you to create Picture Communication Symbols. Most SLPs and schools use this symbol set to create low tech AAC displays.